thanks to-Michael Dolby

Image may contain: outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train, sky and outdoor

Image may contain: train, sky and outdoor

Image may contain: train, sky, cloud and outdoor

Image may contain: outdoor

Image may contain: one or more people, train and outdoor

Image may contain: train, sky and outdoor

Brand new electric locos stored at Manchester, 1959. New locos were being delivered faster than the extension of the electrification southwards, so they were being stored. Another place where you would see new electric locos stored was Witton sidings

Image may contain: sky, cloud and outdoor

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

Image may contain: outdoor

Image may contain: outdoor

Image may contain: outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Image may contain: train

In store at Carlisle, 1964.

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

Saltley, 1960. Before warning panels, when all the diesels looked better.

 

93

 

Great Western Railway steam railmotor 93 backs out of the former Eynsham “main line” station at Didcot Railway Centre, pushing “auto-coach” trailer 92 toward Oxford Road station.  As can be seen, there are four small driving wheels powered by two small cylinders connected to a vertical boiler.  If you look for the white smoke, you will find roughly where the boiler is.  I should add that the noise was considerable; it sounded like a lot of steam power was being forced through a very small space.  When the steam railmotor rolled out of Swindon Works in 1908, it was a fairly radical concept, but railmotors and multiple-unit trains now carry almost all passengers on British railways.